Blog Archives

Hello, 2017!

• Keep the Fight, Ladies!
• Test Essays??
• Kids Night Out
• Who is Camden?

 

Save the Date: May 6th! Celebrate Naga’s 15th Anniversary!
Want to help with the Quinceaneras party? Talk to Mas Simon!

kung-fu-panda

Kids Night Out – With a Panda?

Friday, Feb. 17th, 6:30-10pm – headed by Mas James M. and his fab crew.  Games, a fun workout, snack and a Kung-Fu Panda movie! You must reserve to attend – sign up and pay at the Studio or online at the store. $30 per child; siblings 2/$50.

WELCOME to kids in our new school programs. Glenview, Chabot, Hillcrest, Crocker, Cragmont, Emerson and Thornhill kids, come try a FREE class at the Studio anytime!

Self-defense!

fight-night-two

Ladies Fight Night is Thursday, February 9th, 6:30-8ish. This fun, empowering class for women/teen girls includes street safety, verbal and physical skills.  Plus, treats because taking care of yourself deserves a reward: $30 or pairs for $50. Graduates of Ladies Fight Night can take “Keep the Fight” a three-class series that builds on LFN skills.  Call for more info or to sign-up!

camden

Meet Camden!

Canden recently joined Naga to help in the office! Please drop by and say hello if you haven’t met him already. He lives in the neighborhood and in addition to working at Whole Foods, has a passion for working out, nature, and playing guitar.

 

 

* Summer Camps are open for registration! We expect to fill up this year, so get on the list – two camp possibilties!

Special training with a visiting instructor!
Friday February 24th and Saturday 25th 3-5. Check the back counter for more details: adults, teens and third phase kids!

mgal-and-tiny

Keep Asking Questions….

The unassuming notebook on the back table is one of my most treasured belongings at Naga. The photo on the front must be over ten years old. About twenty of us in black gi’s are making silly faces and If you look closely, you will recognize most of us – minus a little weathering.

It’s a great photo, but what’s inside is even more fun.  Stuffed in that tattered notebook are “testing” essays: some funny, some sad, some surprising.

Each chronicles a moment, gives an insight into that student at that rank. And each answers a question: why do I train? What does training mean to me? There are essays by “Mas” Abby and “Mas” Dee, now seasoned Bantoes, and a scribbled eloquent response to “What have I learned in training?” by a very young Mas Karen. “It is OK to mess up,” was her answer.

Since beginning training in 1984, I have never stopped asking myself these same questions – and still, my answers are constantly changing! I began training to get exercise, to meet some people. These reasons still stick, and I see them echoed by others. And more answers have come to me: to find out who I am, to battle my fears, to become a better version of me.

Take a look at the notebook. It might prompt you to ask, why do I do what I do? Life is precious and asking why we do what we do is the beauty of being alive.

Here are a few highlights from the book – but there are so many:

It makes you cry when your back is so sore you cannot bend over to take off your knee pads and your training partner drops and rolls your pant legs up and pulls your knee pads off and says to you “I’m here for you brother.”  – Mas Simon

Once when I was climbing on a high concrete planter and fell off but I caught myself in a slap-off. Also now I know when Mas Julia is about to try to scare me.  – Mas Miriam.

I train because I had an amazing teacher who taught me what is was to shine, and that to shine you must help others do so as well. – Pendekkar Emily

I have used Poekoelan twice to save my life; neither time involved physical conflict. – Bantoe Nick

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January 20, 2017 · 6:07 pm